Quiztory: Week of August 7

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. How long did it take the House of Representatives to pass the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution?

2. What was FBI official Mark Felt’s codename?

3. Who voted to pass the Quit India Resolution in 1942?

4. What were the first objects to enter the Smithsonian Institution?

5. How did California attempt to block the fair housing portion of the Civil Rights Act?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the Social Security Act, the opening of the Panama Canal, President Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky and the 19th Amendment. We’ll also take a look at the death of baseball player Ray Chapman, the USS Constitution and Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture.”

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

Web Sites for Researching History

These 10 trustworthy Web sites provide detailed accounts of historical events and figures, and collections of primary source material designed to help middle and high school students research U.S. and world history.

The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is a great source to find historical documents, photos, art, maps, audio and video, artifacts and other items. The American Memory section organizes items based on topics, time periods and places of American history. The World Digital Library, a cooperative project with UNESCO, includes rare documents from around the world.

National Archives

The National Archives and Records Administration has a massive collection of material on U.S. history that can sometimes be overwhelming to search through. The Resources for National History Day Research page guides students on where to find material in the archives. In the Teaching With Documents section, assorted events are explained through primary documents in the archive’s collections.

Center for History and New Media

George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media has created a range of Web sites designed for the needs of students and teachers. It includes basic surveys of U.S. and world history, sites that teach students to use primary sources, and sites that provide lesson plans and ideas for teachers. It also features several Web sites of archives and exhibits.

PBS

PBS has a wide range of resources for students from its various programs. The most useful is likely the companion Web sites for the American Experience documentary series examining important events and people in American history. Each site includes resources such as descriptions of the events, biographies of key figures, primary source documents, interactive maps and transcripts of the film. Also visit the American Masters series for biographies of historical figures.

Digital History

Digital History is an online textbook that provides a chronological overview of American history. It also includes primary sources and detailed features on topics such as ethnic America, Abraham Lincoln, Reconstruction and controversial topics of today.

The Avalon Project

Yale Law School’s Avalon Project provides a database of documents such as laws, treaties, declarations, constitutions, speeches and statements from ancient history to the 21st century. Documents are organized by time period and by topic.

HistoryNet

HistoryNet is home to more than 5,000 articles published in Weider History Group magazines, which include American History, Military History, Wild West and World War II.

Country Studies

The Country Studies/Area Handbook Series is a compilation of books written between 1986 and 1998 that details the history of more than 110 countries, dating back to the earliest settlements. It was created by U.S. Department of the Army and printed by the Library of Congress.

EyeWitness to History

EyeWitness to History features first-person accounts of prominent events in U.S. and world history, along with a simple explanation of the event’s importance.

UMKC School of Law

University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law professor Douglas Linder has compiled research pages for more than 50 of the most famous trials in history, dating back to the trial of Socrates 399 B.C. Each page includes a detailed account of the events of and leading up to the trial, court documents such as witness testimony and trial excerpts, and other primary documents such as newspaper accounts and letters.

Related Link Resources
The Library of Congress
The Library of Congress: World Digital Library
Library of Congress
The National Archives
The National Archives: Resources for National History Day Research
The National Archives
Center for History and New Media
PBS: American Experience
American Masters
Digital History
Yale Law School: Avalon Project
HistoryNet
Country Studies
Eyewitness to History
University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law: Famous Trials

The Answer Sheet: Week of July 31

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. Why did the Iraqi army take the passengers of British Airways Flight 149 as hostages in 1990? To use them as “human shields

2. Why were Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, civil rights workers in Mississippi, arrested on June 21, 1964? For speeding

3. What did The New York Times call “a victory for organized labor” in 1993? President Bill Clinton’s lifting of the ban on federal reemployment of workers who strike against the government

4. Which Supreme Court case ruled that an income tax was unconstitutional? Pollock v. Farm Loan and Trust Co.

5. What was the nickname for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki? Fat Man

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Iraq Invades Kuwait, Leading to Persian Gulf War
On This Day: Bodies of Three Civil Rights Workers Discovered in ...
On This Day: US Air Traffic Controllers Go On Strike
On This Day: Congress Passes Act Creating First Income Tax
On This Day: US Drops Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

Quiztory: Week of July 31

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. Why did the Iraqi army take the passengers of British Airways Flight 149 as hostages in 1990?

2. Why were Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, civil rights workers in Mississippi, arrested on June 21, 1964?

3. What did The New York Times call “a victory for organized labor” in 1993?

4. Which Supreme Court case ruled that an income tax was unconstitutional?

5. What was the nickname for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the discovery of Machu Picchu, the Air France Concorde crash, the first prosecuted computer hacker and the explosion at Atlanta’s Olympic Park. We’ll also take a look at the Empire State Building airplane crash, the USS Forrestal fire and the adoption of “In God We Trust” as the motto of the United States.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

Educators That Rock!: Bill Reilly

Bill Reilly in Saudi Arabia.

As the founder of the Global Coalition Project, Bill Reilly has united classrooms around the globe through his vision to promote peace and global understanding. A social studies teacher at Bethlehem Central Middle School in Delmar, N.Y., for the last 16 years, Reilly was named one of Disney’s Educators of the Year in 2006 for his exceptional ability to teach “real world” lessons. Two years prior to that, he was chosen by the American Councils for International Education to represent the United States in a Eurasian/American teacher exchange in Azerbaijan.

FindingEducation met Reilly while attending the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) conference last week. Reilly described watching his students meet another group of students in Belize for the first time through an online video conference. “It was like two groups meeting aliens for the first time,” he said. “They were such different and diverse cultures, and they had such an interest in learning about each other.”

fE: What made you become a teacher?

BR: I was an archeologist for a few years and then an owner of a rare coin store. So I always had a love for history. I then walked into a children’s home one summer, thinking that I would work with kids for a summer until I decided what business to go into, and I never left working with children after that. I teach ancient history to sixth graders.

Read the rest of this entry »

Related Link Resources
Disney Teacher Awards: The 2006 Honorees
The Global Coalition for Peace, Education and Cultural Awareness
ePals

The Answer Sheet: Week of July 24

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. When Hiram Bingham discovered Machu Picchu, what mythical city did he think he might have discovered? Tampu-tocco

2. How many Concorde jets were built before the jets were retired? 20

3. How did Wells Fargo detective James B. Hume track down “Black Bart”? Through a handkerchief left at the scene of a holdup

4. The Empire State Building was constructed as a competition between which two men? Walter Chrysler and John Jakob Raskob

5. What was considered the de facto motto of the United States prior to 1955? E pluribus unum

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Hiram Bingham Discovers Lost Inca City of Machu Picchu
On This Day: Air France Concorde Flight Crashes, Killing 113
On This Day: Airplane Crashes Into Empire State Building, Killing 14

Quiztory: Week of July 24

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. When Hiram Bingham discovered Machu Picchu, what mythical city did he think he might have discovered?

2. How many Concorde jets were built before the jets were retired?

3. How did Wells Fargo detective James B. Hume track down “Black Bart”?

4. The Empire State Building was constructed as a competition between which two men?

5. What was considered the de facto motto of the United States prior to 1955?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the discovery of Machu Picchu, the Air France Concorde crash, the first prosecuted computer hacker and the explosion at Atlanta’s Olympic Park. We’ll also take a look at the Empire State Building airplane crash, the USS Forrestal fire and the adoption of “In God We Trust” as the motto of the United States.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

World’s Greatest Libraries: Past and Present

J. Scott Applewhite/AP
The Library of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Explore some of the most significant libraries from the ancient and modern world, including the largest, the oldest and the most technologically advanced, as well as those with unique collections, architecture or locations.

Great Libraries of the Past

Perhaps one of the best-known libraries of ancient times is the Library of Alexandria. Founded in 228 B.C. in Alexandria, Egypt, this library housed 700,000 scrolls. Many famous thinkers of the time studied or worked in the library, including the astronomers Aristarchus and Eratosthenes, the poet Callimachus, the mathematician Euclid, the scientist Herophilus and the historian Manetho. The library survived for six centuries, but slowly disappeared after a fire and numerous invasions and wars. The library was gone by 400 A.D. But after years of scholars pushing for the revival of the great library, on Oct. 16, 2002, Egypt celebrated the opening of the New Library of Alexandria, designed to rival the original.

About a hundred years after the great Library of Alexandra was formed, another great library was established. After the ruler of Egypt banned the export of papyrus (the plant used to make paper), it is thought that parchment was developed in the city of Pergamum—in modern-day Turkey—which made possible the copying of books outside of Egypt, and the development of the Library at Pergamum. According to Encyclopedia Britannica, eventually the library, along with the entire city, was turned over to Rome, and some think that its collection was given to Cleopatra to become part of the Library of Alexandria.

Predating the libraries at Pergamum and Alexandria was the Library of King Ashurbanipal at the city of Nineveh. In the 600s B.C., Ashurbanipal established a great library housing tens of thousands of cuneiform tablets. The library had many of the same characteristics of a modern library; for example texts, were organized by subject matter, government documents were also held in the library and there were citations explaining what sets of tablets and rooms contained. Eventually the library was buried during an invasion, and although Ashurbanipal’s library was not the first library, it was one of the largest of its time, and one of the first libraries to implement cataloging as we use today.

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The Answer Sheet: Week of July 17

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. What marked the beginning of the Russian Civil War? The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk

2. Where did Hitler write “Mein Kampf?” His private cell in Landsberg prison

3. Who said that it “were better that ten suspected witches should escape than one innocent person should be condemned.” Increase Mather

4. How many Apollo missions were launched before the Apollo 11 crew touched down on the moon in 1969? Five

5. After the 12th Street riot in Detroit in 1967, to what did the Detroit mayor compare the damage in his city? Berlin in 1945

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Bolsheviks Execute Czar Nicholas II and Family
On This Day: Hitler's “Mein Kampf” Published
On This Day: Five Women Hanged in Salem for Witchcraft
On This Day: Man Walks on the Moon
On This Day: 12th Street Riot Devastates Detroit

Quiztory: Week of July 17

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. What marked the beginning of the Russian Civil War?

2. Where did Hitler write “Mein Kampf?”

3. Who said that it “were better that ten suspected witches should escape than one innocent person should be condemned.”

4. How many Apollo missions were launched before the Apollo 11 crew touched down on the moon in 1969?

5. After the 12th Street riot in Detroit in 1967, to what did the Detroit mayor compare the damage in his city?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the discovery of Machu Picchu, the Air France Concorde crash, the first prosecuted computer hacker and the explosion at Atlanta’s Olympic Park. We’ll also take a look at the Empire State Building airplane crash, the USS Forrestal fire and the adoption of “In God We Trust” as the motto of the United States.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column