Archive for the ‘Social Studies’ Subject

The Answer Sheet: Week of August 14

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. When were the first amendments made to the Social Security Act? 1939

2. Why did Mohandas Gandhi miss India’s first Independence Day celebration? He was fasting to protest the partition of India and Pakistan

3. What was the first major league baseball team to mandate helmets for their players? The Pirates

4. What was the first U.S. state to grant women the right to vote? Wyoming

5. When was the USS Constitution first launched? Oct. 21, 1797

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Social Security Act Signed Into Law
On This Day: India Gains Independence from Britain
On This Day: Ray Chapman Fatally Injured by Pitch
On This Day: 19th Amendment Gives Women Right to Vote
On This Day: USS Constitution Earns Nickname “Old Ironsides”

Quiztory: Week of August 14

Friday, August 20th, 2010

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. When were the first amendments made to the Social Security Act?

2. Why did Mohandas Gandhi miss India’s first Independence Day celebration?

3. What was the first major league baseball team to mandate helmets for their players?

4. What was the first U.S. state to grant women the right to vote?

5. When was the USS Constitution first launched?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the first Lincoln-Douglas debate, the burning of the White House in 1814 and the “Baltic Way.” We’ll also take a look at Nat Turner, the day Paris was liberated from German occupation, the Cuban slave ship Amistad and the Drake Well.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

The Answer Sheet: Week of August 7

Monday, August 16th, 2010

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. How long did it take the House of Representatives to pass the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution? 40 minutes

2. What was FBI official Mark Felt’s codename? Deep Throat

3. Who voted to pass the Quit India Resolution in 1942? The All India Congress Committee

4. What were the first objects to enter the Smithsonian Institution? Scientific materials and books of art

5. How did California attempt to block the fair housing portion of the Civil Rights Act? The state created Proposition 14

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Smithsonian Institution Established
On This Day: Watts Riots Erupt in Los Angeles
On This Day: Gandhi's Arrest Sparks “Quit India” Movement

Quiztory: Week of August 7

Friday, August 13th, 2010

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. How long did it take the House of Representatives to pass the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution?

2. What was FBI official Mark Felt’s codename?

3. Who voted to pass the Quit India Resolution in 1942?

4. What were the first objects to enter the Smithsonian Institution?

5. How did California attempt to block the fair housing portion of the Civil Rights Act?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the Social Security Act, the opening of the Panama Canal, President Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky and the 19th Amendment. We’ll also take a look at the death of baseball player Ray Chapman, the USS Constitution and Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture.”

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

The Answer Sheet: Week of July 31

Monday, August 9th, 2010

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. Why did the Iraqi army take the passengers of British Airways Flight 149 as hostages in 1990? To use them as “human shields

2. Why were Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, civil rights workers in Mississippi, arrested on June 21, 1964? For speeding

3. What did The New York Times call “a victory for organized labor” in 1993? President Bill Clinton’s lifting of the ban on federal reemployment of workers who strike against the government

4. Which Supreme Court case ruled that an income tax was unconstitutional? Pollock v. Farm Loan and Trust Co.

5. What was the nickname for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki? Fat Man

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Iraq Invades Kuwait, Leading to Persian Gulf War
On This Day: Bodies of Three Civil Rights Workers Discovered in ...
On This Day: US Air Traffic Controllers Go On Strike
On This Day: Congress Passes Act Creating First Income Tax
On This Day: US Drops Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

Quiztory: Week of July 31

Friday, August 6th, 2010

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. Why did the Iraqi army take the passengers of British Airways Flight 149 as hostages in 1990?

2. Why were Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, civil rights workers in Mississippi, arrested on June 21, 1964?

3. What did The New York Times call “a victory for organized labor” in 1993?

4. Which Supreme Court case ruled that an income tax was unconstitutional?

5. What was the nickname for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the discovery of Machu Picchu, the Air France Concorde crash, the first prosecuted computer hacker and the explosion at Atlanta’s Olympic Park. We’ll also take a look at the Empire State Building airplane crash, the USS Forrestal fire and the adoption of “In God We Trust” as the motto of the United States.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

Educators That Rock!: Bill Reilly

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

Bill Reilly in Saudi Arabia.

As the founder of the Global Coalition Project, Bill Reilly has united classrooms around the globe through his vision to promote peace and global understanding. A social studies teacher at Bethlehem Central Middle School in Delmar, N.Y., for the last 16 years, Reilly was named one of Disney’s Educators of the Year in 2006 for his exceptional ability to teach “real world” lessons. Two years prior to that, he was chosen by the American Councils for International Education to represent the United States in a Eurasian/American teacher exchange in Azerbaijan.

FindingEducation met Reilly while attending the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) conference last week. Reilly described watching his students meet another group of students in Belize for the first time through an online video conference. “It was like two groups meeting aliens for the first time,” he said. “They were such different and diverse cultures, and they had such an interest in learning about each other.”

fE: What made you become a teacher?

BR: I was an archeologist for a few years and then an owner of a rare coin store. So I always had a love for history. I then walked into a children’s home one summer, thinking that I would work with kids for a summer until I decided what business to go into, and I never left working with children after that. I teach ancient history to sixth graders.

(more…)

Related Link Resources
Disney Teacher Awards: The 2006 Honorees
The Global Coalition for Peace, Education and Cultural Awareness
ePals

The Answer Sheet: Week of July 24

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. When Hiram Bingham discovered Machu Picchu, what mythical city did he think he might have discovered? Tampu-tocco

2. How many Concorde jets were built before the jets were retired? 20

3. How did Wells Fargo detective James B. Hume track down “Black Bart”? Through a handkerchief left at the scene of a holdup

4. The Empire State Building was constructed as a competition between which two men? Walter Chrysler and John Jakob Raskob

5. What was considered the de facto motto of the United States prior to 1955? E pluribus unum

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Hiram Bingham Discovers Lost Inca City of Machu Picchu
On This Day: Air France Concorde Flight Crashes, Killing 113
On This Day: Airplane Crashes Into Empire State Building, Killing 14

Quiztory: Week of July 24

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with Quiztory. It makes a fun extra credit assignment.

1. When Hiram Bingham discovered Machu Picchu, what mythical city did he think he might have discovered?

2. How many Concorde jets were built before the jets were retired?

3. How did Wells Fargo detective James B. Hume track down “Black Bart”?

4. The Empire State Building was constructed as a competition between which two men?

5. What was considered the de facto motto of the United States prior to 1955?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine the discovery of Machu Picchu, the Air France Concorde crash, the first prosecuted computer hacker and the explosion at Atlanta’s Olympic Park. We’ll also take a look at the Empire State Building airplane crash, the USS Forrestal fire and the adoption of “In God We Trust” as the motto of the United States.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

The Answer Sheet: Week of July 17

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. What marked the beginning of the Russian Civil War? The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk

2. Where did Hitler write “Mein Kampf?” His private cell in Landsberg prison

3. Who said that it “were better that ten suspected witches should escape than one innocent person should be condemned.” Increase Mather

4. How many Apollo missions were launched before the Apollo 11 crew touched down on the moon in 1969? Five

5. After the 12th Street riot in Detroit in 1967, to what did the Detroit mayor compare the damage in his city? Berlin in 1945

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Bolsheviks Execute Czar Nicholas II and Family
On This Day: Hitler's “Mein Kampf” Published
On This Day: Five Women Hanged in Salem for Witchcraft
On This Day: Man Walks on the Moon
On This Day: 12th Street Riot Devastates Detroit