Archive for November, 2009

The Answer Sheet: Week of Nov. 21

Monday, November 30th, 2009

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. Which German paleontologist predicted in the 1920s that the Piltdown man skull was a composite of human and orangutan skulls? Franz Weidenreich

2. Of the 11 Hollywood writers and directors accused of being members of the Communist Party in 1947, who was the only one to answer the question? Bertolt Brecht

3. How old was British archaeologist Howard Carter when he first travelled to Egypt? 17 years old

4. What was the name of the document, signed by President Ronald Reagan, that gave the CIA permission to recruit paramilitary units to fight against Nicaragua’s Sandinista regime? National Security Decision Directive 17

5. When did Harvey Milk become the first openly gay San Francisco City supervisor? 1977

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Piltdown Man, Supposed “Missing Link,” Exposed as Hoax
On This Day: Congress Holds the “Hollywood Ten” in Contempt
On This Day: King Tut's Tomb Discovered
On This Day: Reagan Endorses CIA Support of Nicaraguan Contras
On This Day: Harvey Milk Murdered

Quiztory: Week of Nov. 21

Friday, November 27th, 2009

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with the Quiztory—a quiz on important events in history. A new Quiztory will run every Friday.

1. Which German paleontologist predicted in the 1920s that the Piltdown man skull was a composite of human and orangutan skulls?

2. Of the 11 Hollywood writers and directors accused of being members of the Communist Party in 1947, who was the only one to confirm or deny the accusation?

3. How old was British archaeologist Howard Carter when he first travelled to Egypt?

4. What was the name of the document, signed by President Ronald Reagan, that gave the CIA permission to recruit paramilitary units to fight against Nicaragua’s Sandinista regime?

5. When did Harvey Milk become the first openly gay San Francisco City supervisor?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will take a look at Margaret Thatcher’s resignation, the United Nations vote to partition Palestine in 1947 and the opening of the “Place au Jeunes” in 1886. We’ll also examine the Eurotunnel, Enron’s bankruptcy, the Bhopal gas disaster and the release of Terry Anderson, the last U.S. hostage in Lebanon.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

Educators That Rock!: Helene Blowers

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

Helene Blowers in a photo by Scott Weaver.

Helene Blowers is the digital strategies director for the Columbus Metropolitan Library in Ohio, which was recently rated a five-star library by Library Journal for the second year in a row. Named a “mover and a shaker” by the same publication in 2007, Blowers created the Learning 2.0 project, which has been duplicated by more than 700 organizations worldwide.

Blowers also writes a blog called LibraryBytes where she examines trends and offers constructive advice for other lifelong learners.

fE: What made you choose to become a librarian?

HB: By some people’s definition I may not be a librarian because I do not have formalized training. But I have worked in libraries for 17 years.

I work in libraries because I’m passionate about learning. I started as a library page at my hometown library when I was in high school and ended up also working in the library in college, processing interlibrary loans as part of my work-study program. My degree is actually in organizational communications and after college I started doing a lot of  technology training. That was in the early 1990s. From teaching technology at the community college, I then jumped back into libraries from an education standpoint, becoming Charlotte Mecklenberg’s public library’s first library resource trainer.

Now, I’m the digital strategies director for the Columbus Metropolitan Library and although my specific area of focus is mostly in the digital space, it’s really the learning  aspect that keeps me here.

(more…)

Related Link Resources
Learning 2.0
LibraryBytes
Columbus Metropolitan Library
Library Journal
Library 101
Library Journal
Delicious
BookGlutton

The Answer Sheet: Week of Nov. 14

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. What was the German attack on the British city of Coventry called? Operation Midnight Sonata

2. How old was Queen Elizabeth I when she was coronated? 25 years old

3. Which party did Benazir Bhutto defeat to become the first female leader of a Muslim-majority nation? Islamic Democratic Alliance

4. Which school principal was the first to develop the four U.S. time zones? Charles F. Dowd

5. Who tried to out-race Nellie Bly when she set out to circle the globe in 1889? Elizabeth Bisland

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Coventry Devastated By German Bombing
On This Day: Elizabeth I Becomes Queen of England
On This Day: Benazir Bhutto Elected Prime Minister of Pakistan
On This Day: US Time Zones Established by Railways
On This Day: Nellie Bly Begins Her Around-the-World Journey

Quiztory: Week of Nov. 14

Friday, November 20th, 2009

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with the Quiztory—a quiz on important events in history. A new Quiztory will run every Friday.

1. What was the German attack on the British city of Coventry called?

2. How old was Queen Elizabeth I when she was coronated?

3. Which party did Benazir Bhutto defeat to become the first female leader of a Muslim-majority nation?

4. Which school principal was the first to develop the four U.S. time zones?

5. Who tried to out-race Nellie Bly when she set out to circle the globe in 1889?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine Thomas Edison and his invention of the phonograph, President Ronald Reagan’s endorsement of CIA support to the Nicaraguan Contras and accusations that the “Hollywood Ten” were communists. We’ll also take a look at the discovery of King Tut’s tomb and the day that openly gay San Francisco City Supervisor Harvey Milk was murdered.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

The Answer Sheet: Week of Nov. 7

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. Who did Josef Stalin expel from the Communist party in 1927? Leon Trotsky

2. On Nov. 9, 1989, which symbol of the Iron Curtain came down? The Berlin Wall

3. Whose experiments with cathode rays led him to discover X-rays? Wilhelm Roentgen

4. Which player for the Los Angeles Lakers announced that he had HIV in 1991? Magic Johnson

5. When did Germany and the Allied forces sign an armistice, bringing World War I to an end? Nov. 11, 1918

Related Link Resources
On this Day: Trotsky is Expelled from Communist Party
On This Day: The Berlin Wall Comes Down
On This Day: Scientist Wilhelm Roentgen Discovers X-Rays
On This Day: Magic Johnson Reveals That He Has HIV
On This Day: Armistice Ends World War I

Quiztory: Week of Nov. 7

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with the Quiztory—a quiz on important events in history. A new Quiztory will run every Friday.

1. Who did Josef Stalin expel from the Communist party in 1927?

2. On Nov. 9, 1989, which symbol of the Iron Curtain came down?

3. Whose experiments with cathode rays led him to discover X-rays?

4. Which player for the Los Angeles Lakers announced that he had HIV in 1991?

5. When did Germany and the Allied forces sign an armistice, bringing World War I to an end?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine Nellie Bly and her around-the-world journey, Queen Elizabeth I and her ascension to the throne of England, and Reverend Jim Jones and his commune in Jonestown, Guyana. We’ll also take a look at the day that Coventry was destroyed by German bombing during WWII, the election of Benazir Bhutto as prime minister of Pakistan, President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the Nuremberg Trials.

Related Link Resources
On This Day column

Educators That Rock!: danah boyd

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

danah boyd in a photo by Gilad Lotan.

Last week, findingEducation caught up with Dr. danah boyd at the American Association of School Librarians National Conference in Charlotte, N.C. boyd is an internationally recognized social media expert researcher for Microsoft Research New England, a fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and an ethnographer, blogger and contributing author to the book “Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media.

boyd explains on her blog that “there are a lot of reasons … some personal and some political” as to why she decided to omit the capital letters in her name. A keynote speaker at the conference, she drew from her research on social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook to explain how kids use these tools to communicate and to “create digital bodies” to express themselves.

In her online biography, boyd describes herself as a bored and rebellious student that went to “smart kids camp” in the summer but had trouble fitting in until she went online. “The Internet opened the door of possibilities to me. I found other smart kids year round … Strangers taught me so much about the world and about myself,” she wrote.

“Unstructured environments are critical to social learning,” boyd said in her talk. Educators must “work with the grain, not against it.” She told findingEducation, “It’s not about getting kids to be passionate about the things that librarians and teachers are passionate about, but using what kids are passionate about as gateways to learning.”

(more…)

Related Link Resources
danah.org
danah.org: "The Not-So-Hidden Politics of Class Online"
American Association of School Librarians: General Sessions
apophenia: Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out
V-Day

The Answer Sheet: Week of Oct. 31

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Did you take the Quiztory last week? Now it’s time to check your answers:

1. Who did two Puerto Rican nationalists try to assassinate on Nov. 1, 1950? President Harry Truman

2. When did the Iran hostage crisis begin? Nov. 4, 1979

3. What was Martin Luther’s list of grievances against the Catholic Church called? “Ninety-five Theses

4. Which women’s rights activist led a group of women to vote in a presidential election on Nov. 5, 1872? Susan B. Anthony

5. Which Lebanese newspaper broke the story of top secret United States arms sales to Iran? Al-Shiraa

Related Link Resources
On This Day: Puerto Rican Nationalists Attempt to Assassinate Truman
On This Day: Iran Hostage Crisis Begins
On This Day: Martin Luther Nails Ninety-Five Theses to Chapel Door
On This Day: Susan B. Anthony Votes in Presidential Election
On this Day: Iran-Contra Scandal Breaks in a Lebanese Magazine

Quiztory: Week of Oct. 31

Friday, November 6th, 2009

Test your students’ knowledge of the notable events covered in findingDulcinea’s “On This Day” column this week with the Quiztory—a quiz on important events in history. A new Quiztory will run every Friday.

1. Who did two Puerto Rican nationalists try to assassinate on Nov. 1, 1950?

2. When did the Iran hostage crisis begin?

3. What was Martin Luther’s list of grievances against the Catholic Church called?

4. Which women’s rights activist led a group of women to vote in a presidential election on Nov. 5, 1872?

5. Which Lebanese newspaper broke the story of top secret United States arms sales to Iran?

What’s Coming Up?

Next week, “On This Day” will examine basketball player Magic Johnson and his announcement that he had HIV, and German scientist Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of X-rays. We’ll also take a look at Leon Trotsky’s expulsion from the Communist party, the day that the Berlin Wall came down and the Kristallnacht attacks on Jewish communities in Europe in 1938.